10 tips to help you take better pictures of your kids

focus-on-the-eyes

Jennifer Borget


posted: March 19, 2014, 7:09 am

in: Baby>, Preschooler>, Toddler>, You and Your Family>, Me & My Kids>, Mom Stories

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We all want cute pictures of our kids. My children are responsible for my newfound love of photography. You’ll rarely find me without some kind of camera in hand, or at least nearby. I like to be ready to snap the moment when I see it happen, and it helps if I’m prepared.

Here are 10 tips to help you take better pictures of your kids:

1. Have your kids face the light: You’ll notice little sparkles of light in their eyes called catch lights. It’ll also make it easier to get sharper, more colorful pictures.
2. Don’t say cheese/ be silly: A forced smile rarely looks as pretty as a real one. I make silly faces, noises, even jump up and down. With my daughter, I sometimes ask her to jump as high as she can, or toss something her way. It always gets a genuine smile out of her.
3. Sneak up on them: I love catching my kids in the middle of whatever their doing, when they have no idea I’m nearby. Those candid moments are some of my most precious photographs.
4. Get down on their level: We get so used to taking photos from up above where we stand. Bend down or even lie down on the ground next to your kids to get photos at their eye level.
5. Snap a few in a row: If you’re trying to capture a certain face, or milestone, be ready to rapid fire.

6. Don’t stop to check your camera (you may miss the moment): Check to see what you got after the fact, if you pause to check too soon you may miss the shot you were trying to get.
7. Focus on their eyes: If you find your shots seem to come out fuzzy, check your focal point to make sure you’re focusing on the eyes.
8. Avoid harsh lighting (stand in shadows): My favorite time to take pictures is early in the morning and around sunset. The lightening when taking pictures outside is wonderful. If you’re going to take pictures earlier, be sure to look for a shady spot to avoid harsh shadows.
9. Let them do what they love: My daughter loves dressing up, dancing, and my son loves banging on things, and sneaking bites of chalk. If I get in close, I can capture a photo of a very happy child.
10. Have an extra battery/ keep your camera charged: There’s nothing worse than grabbing your camera to capture a special moment and there’s no charge. Either get an extra battery so one can be charging while another is in use, or keep a good system down for keeping the battery full.

For more photo tips check out 10 must-capture moments during your baby’s first year.

Jennifer is a domestically challenged part-time journalist, and a full-time mom. She’s a parenting reporter, living big adventures with her family in Texas. To catch more of her motherhood journey, follow @JenniferBorget on Twitter, Instagram or Pinterest and read more from her personal blog at BabyMakingMachine.com.

Photo credit: Jennifer Borget

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